• FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2016 - BOOKS IN BROWSERS 2016

    FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2016 - BOOKS IN BROWSERS 2016

    Happy to share that I will be giving a talk at this year's Books in Browsers 2016 conference in San Francisco, CA. Below, you will see my abstract. The line-up is fantastic and I'm very excited to be a part of this year's group.

    The Book as Cartography: The Materialization of Digital and Imagined Spaces

    Despite resistance by connoisseurs and lovers of printed material, the advancement of digital applications and platforms rivals physical bookmaking and publishing at a faster rate. Yet the practices of artists and cultural producer partnerships such as Moreshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke, Liat Berdugo and Elia Vargas, or Amaranth Borsuk, Kate Durbin, and Ian Hatcher, bound material becomes more than an archive and mere documentation. The book becomes a cartography of imagined landscapes, an amalgamation of repeated, familiar, and patented gestures, or rhizomatic mapping of 3D-printed fantasies.

    In Allahyari and Rourke’s Additivist Manifesto, the collection of “recipes” in their particular cookbook serves as a reflection of the effects and impact of 3D printing to contemporary culture. From the fantastical to the nightmarish, addivism has become a movement realized through this particular book project. The Living Room Light Exchange is yet another example of the result of intimate living room talks that have occurred with no official documentation, but has manifested its presence in the Bay Area art scene into a publication based on memory and tangential experiences of its contributors. Lastly, the collaborative work of Borsuk, Durbin, and Hatcher to create a ABRA as a living text and originally created it as a mobile platform specific to haptic technology, but has evolved and manifested into both analog form and medium for performance art. The aforementioned examples serve as a constellation of how the book becomes a poetic, non-linear, and magical place.

    About Books in Browsers
    This year, Books in Browsers is moving beyond the boundaries of books in browsers to examine how images and videos, alongside text, are being adopted to form new narratives, instructional materials, and scholarship, and how this shift is reframing what we expect and how we learn. Books in Browsers is produced and sponsored by UC Davis and the Frankfurt Book Fair.

    Register for the conference here

  • WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2016 - REAL FUTURE LAB: QUEERING TECH

    WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2016 - REAL FUTURE LAB: QUEERING TECH

    Diversity in big tech is a big problem, but while start-up culture debates how to best diversify a field historically dominated by white cis-men, there are artists who have been innovating with tech outside of the establishment. We will look at the work of queer artists investigating identity through tech with curator and writer Dorothy Santos. We will also be joined by game artist Anna Anthropy, whose games explore the intersection of transfeminine identity, technology and witchcraft. You’ll have a chance to play some of her games as we unpack the virtues of technology as a tool for self expression, and the danger of such projects being used as cultural tourism.
    This is a free event in an ADA compliant space. Want to be invited each month to our monthly salons? Register here.

    WHEN: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
    WHERE: Fusion - 1922 Webster Street, Oakland, CA 94612

  • TUESDAY, MAY 10, 2016 - LECTURE AT SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY

    TUESDAY, MAY 10, 2016 - LECTURE AT SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY

    Excited to be giving a lecture at San Jose State University to the Department of Art and Art History on Digital Art and New Media on Tuesday, May 10 in Art #133 from 5:00 - 6:00 pm. Learn more here.

  • SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2016 - FACETS CON, PANELIST

    SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2016 - FACETS CON, PANELIST

    Thrilled that I will be in conversation with Jenna Wortham of the New York Times and Kimberly Drew, Social Media Producer at The Met and creator and founder of Black Contemporary Art

    Mission Statement

    FACETS grew out out of a need for a new type of conference and a new type of conversation. Art, interactive technology, new media and game design are making innovative, beautiful things and are using similar tools and having similar, ground breaking discoveries and conversations but not with each other. What can a game designer learn from the linear mathematics used from procedurally generated music? What can the new media academic teach the creative technologist? How does technology inform storytelling, and how will video game design change cinema? The aim of FACETS is to create a cross disciplinary conference that facilitates conversation, mentorship, innovation, and ideation across these disciplines. We all make amazing things, let's make them together.

    Organized by Caroline Sinders and created by Caroline Sinders, Mohini Freya Dutta, Phoenix Perry, and Jane Friedhoff, FACETS started out of a frustration with a lack of places to discuss interactive art, media, and game design, particularly with talented and underrepresented demographics in STEM.

  • THURSDAY, APRIL 28 - SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2016 - Digital Arts & New Media MFA Exhibition

    THURSDAY, APRIL 28 - SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2016 - Digital Arts & New Media MFA Exhibition

    2016 Digital Arts & New Media MFA Exhibition
    Thursday, April 28 – Sunday, May 1, 2016, 12-5pm
    Digital Arts Research Center
    University of California, Santa Cruz

    The 2016 graduates from the Digital Arts and New Media (DANM) MFA Program are presenting their work in the exhibition, Blind Spot. Thirteen artists are creating and iterating within realms not easily decipherable and detected in the conventional art world. Each artist has worked in the critical spaces of game design, performance, post cinematic space, scientific theory, economic systems, or interactive media to resist and expand long-established, canonical meanings of art.

    The title of the exhibition refers directly to the punctum caecum or blind spot. It is the area of the eye where photoreceptors do not exist, hence the inability to render or detect an image. In order to see what is in our blind spot, we must shift and alternate our positioning or gaze. But it certainly does not mean that which we cannot see does not exist. In a metaphorical sense, these artists create in such a space that requires the viewer to move and shift for the work to be seen and experienced.

    In the works of Nick Andrade and Hope Hutman, the defining features commonly known to traditional theater are shifted into experimental performances. Andrade explores Narco culture through an interpretation of Shakespeare’s Macbeth while Hutman’s participatory work defies the limits of theater and improvisation through the ecosystem of social media-based platform Twitch.tv.

    Cultural critique is prevalent in the works of Timothy Furstnau and Andrea Steves as they collect, archive, and create a taxonomy of capitalism examining aspects of this global economic system that grows increasingly more complex with advancements in technology. The sculptural nature and visual aesthetics of David Harris’s work look at alternative perceptions of color in our contemporary world and our limited field of vision by exploring such topics as unprintable color.

    Artists Sarah Fay Krom, Marcelo Viana Neto, Adrian Phillips, Ben Spalding, and Michael Thomét approach game design in unorthodox and provocative ways. Krom’s work is influenced by the German Expressionist style and engages the viewer in a visual language that transforms the cinematic frame into a playable space. Viana Neto pulls inspiration from Augusto Boal’s Theater of the Oppressed and participatory economics into a game design pedagogy that encourages the creator to go beyond the commodification of game development. In opposition to frontier fantasy games, which leave little room for dialogue, Phillips creates an experience where players directly engage with one another in a colonial dynamic to elicit conversation around a complicated issue. Critical software development and design play an integral role in Spalding’s work as he explores how multi-player narrative design can be done through an art-making context. In Thomét’s work, the player is confronted with alternative experiences and narratives based on his research of player psychology and playing styles.

    Sean Pace’s C.R.A.W.L.E.R., the Community Roving Artists Workshop Lab for Educational Research, serves as a platform for arts outreach, social justice, and field research. The converted military vehicle doubles as a critique of existing educational systems through the subversion and reimagining of older military technology that was once purposed as a defense mechanism and now aims to foster an “artist to artist” co-creating relationship.

    In Steven Trimmer’s Vocal Landscaping, the participant engages with a voice interactive sound installation based on his research of modal vocalization. The participant’s musical voice is used to navigate the landscapes and unlock sound puzzles. Each voice then becomes a part of a larger vocal catalogue. Another sculptural work for the exhibition is Zach Corse’s Encodings in Space and Time. Corse’s work is an immersive large-scale installation influenced by physics, information theory, and the course of Japanese glass fishing floats known to cross the North Pacific gyre. The overall design of the work pulls from the artist’s study of gravitational lensing, a result of Einstein’s theory of general relativity, and irreversible transformations on Earth wrought by human hands.

    This exhibition is free and open to the public.

    Symposium
    Friday, April 22, 2016
    7:30-9 pm, Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History

    Saturday, April 30, 2016
    1:30-3 pm, Digital Arts Research Center, Room 230

    Reception
    Saturday, April 30, 2016
    5-9 pm at the Digital Art Research Center (DARC)
    University of California, Santa Cruz

    Performances
    Friday, April 29, 2016 and Saturday, April 30, 2016
    Hope Hutman, Twitch Odyssey, featuring Tom Johnson as Homer
    4 pm at the Digital Arts Research Center

    Saturday, April 30, 2016
    Mónica Andrade’s Marqués, a Narco-Macbeth, video performance
    5 pm at the Second Stage, Performing Arts Complex

    About the DANM Program at UCSC

    The Digital Arts and New Media (DANM) MFA Program serves as a center for the development and study of digital media and the cultures that they have helped create. Faculty and students are drawn from a variety of backgrounds, such as the arts, computer engineering, humanities, the sciences, and social sciences, to pursue interdisciplinary artistic and scholarly research and production in the context of a broad examination of digital arts and cultures.
    danm.ucsc.edu

  • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2015 - THEORIZING THE WEB, KEYNOTE PANELIST

    FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2015 - THEORIZING THE WEB, KEYNOTE PANELIST

    Having a personality is part of what allows us to understand what it is to be human, to be alive. What does it mean, then, to attribute a personality to a bot? What characteristics are used to flesh out a bot’s character, and how does this reproduce the social inequities that are already built in the way so many of these aspects are regarded socially? Personality is central to botmaking, but not only because some try to make them lifelike. Bots also rearticulate our sense of our own humanity, and they can address (or reproduce) our inhumanity to one another. Debates about artificial intelligence often focus on where “intelligence” begins, but perhaps the more difficult question to ask is what is “artificial.”

    This keynote panel happens during TtW on Friday April 15th in the evening and features,

    Judith Donath, Darius Kazemi, Kate Losse, Joanne McNeil, and Dorothy Santos

    Jenny Davis (moderator)

  • THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2016 - QUEER TECHNOLOGIES: A CONVERSATION

    THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2016 - QUEER TECHNOLOGIES: A CONVERSATION

    Florence and Leo B. Helzel Boardroom, San Francisco Campus
    Free and open to the public
    The event will be moderated by Nicole Archer.

    In what ways does technology -- while enhancing our perceptual capacities -- force us to renegotiate our relationship(s) to our bodies?

    When our physical features, like skin and limbs, are increasingly augmented by digital devices, new forms of embodiment (ways of being in one's body) become possible. Artistic practices and projects forge queer interventions into the presumed boundaries of body via technological mediation:

    * Virtual platforms, such as Second Life, create spaces in which an artist can re-present and render her gender transition through visual allusions to transformation and mythology

    * Deteriorating film stock serves as an almost co-substantial material for bodies at risk during a major biomedical crisis

    * Potential aggressiveness of facial-recognition software is questioned as a force for marking certain bodies as “other”

    * Digital and new media technologies not only unlock more dynamic modes of bodily representation, but also offer both productive and challenging avenues in which subjects can conceptualize material existences outside of normative identities.

    How might these hyperdynamic materialities speak to ongoing conversations about gender as an unstable and fluid construct?

    Queer Technologies proposes that new media technologies, grasped by queer artists, allow us the rich potential to explore/refuse/resist/parody existing gender paradigms (as well as other social issues) and to stake out singularly “queer” identities entirely their own, while also opening new possibilities for queer sociality, affinity, and agency.

    About Queer Conversations on Culture and the Arts

    Queer Conversations on Culture and the Arts brings together locally and nationally renowned artists, writers, filmmakers, and scholars for a series of conversations to discuss a broad range of LGBTQI topics in the humanities, architecture, design, and the arts.

    QCCA is an ongoing collaboration between the Queer Cultural Center, California College of the Arts, and U.C. Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design.

    About Emerging Scholars Program

    Emerging Scholars Program (ESP) brings together recent graduates in the disciplines of fine arts, humanities, social sciences, and environmental design disciplines whose work explores gender identity and issues relevant to queer and trans people of color with Bay Area nonprofit, community-based arts and social-service organizations for a series of conversations that will bring community perspective to their work and develop a network of queer scholars and community partners to foster collaborative research, workshops, and cultural events that will enrich the lives of the queer community.

    [Image: Zach Blas, Fag Face Mask, October 20, 2012, Los Angeles (from Facial Weaponization Suite, 2011-present; Mask generated from the biometric data of queer men’s faces, undetectable by facial recognition technologies. (Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Christopher O’Leary)]

  • PRESS // Selfie ­Portraits and 4K Videos Explode Modern Identity

    PRESS // Selfie ­Portraits and 4K Videos Explode Modern Identity

    I am thrilled to announce that I will have an essay published for Carla Gannis's upcoming solo show "A Subject Self-Defined" at Transfer Gallery (New York, NY) and I got a mention in a write up featured on The Creators Project. You can read it here.

  • FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2015 - 100 YEARS OF ROBOT ART AND SCIENCE IN THE BAY AREA

    FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2015 - 100 YEARS OF ROBOT ART AND SCIENCE IN THE BAY AREA

    de Young Museum, San Francisco
    Free music, cash bar, kids welcome.
    6:30-9pm, Friday, 20 Nov, 2015
    http://deyoung.famsf.org/calendar/friday-nights-de-young-25

    CITRIS-People-and-Robots-iconCo-Sponsored by the CITRIS “People and Robots” Initiative:
    http://robotics.citris-uc.org

    Friday Nights at the de Young are after-hours art happenings that include a mix of live music, dance and theater performances, film screenings, panel discussions, lectures, artist demonstrations, hands-on art activities, and exhibition tours. Local artists conduct drop-in workshops, debut new commissions, display their art in the Kimball Education Gallery, and take part in conversations about the creative process. The café offers a delicious prix-fixe menu and specialty cocktails, and the Hamon Tower observation level is open
    until 8 pm.

    This event, in conjunction with the 100 year anniversary of the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition, is being organized by Kevin Chen from the de Young in collaboration with Ken Goldberg from UC Berkeley and Alexander Rose from The Long Now Foundation.

    The evening will feature in the Theater a series of 10-minute conversations between local artists, researchers, writers, and curators, with artist Jenny Odell as “visual jockey” providing live images:

    Introduction – Ken Goldberg
    Zander Rose & John Markoff
    John Markoff & Terry Winograd
    Terry Winograd & Josette Melchor
    Josette Melchor & David Pescovitz
    David Pescovitz & Karen Marcelo
    Karen Marcelo & Kal Spelletich
    Kal Spelletich & Catharine Clark
    Catharine Clark & Tim Roseborough
    Tim Roseborough & Dorothy Santos
    Dorothy Santos & Pieter Abbeel
    Pieter Abbeel & Zander Rose

    Discussing robots, art, and science from historical and contemporary perspectives. The full exhibition reassembles more than 200 works by major American and European artists, most of which were on display at this defining event (http://deyoung.famsf.org/exhibitions/jewel-city-art-panama-pacific-international-exposition). The 1915 Pan Pacific International Expo was the San Francisco world’s fair that celebrated the opening of the Panama Canal and the city’s reconstruction following the great earthquake of 1906. The grand exposition covered 76 city blocks and boasted national and international pavilions showcasing innovation, industry, and the arts. Taking inspiration from the themes of innovation, technology, and futurism at the fair, we are embracing the idea of robots, art, and science from historical and contemporary perspectives.

  • SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2015 - ETHICS OF NEW MEDIA

    SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2015 - ETHICS OF NEW MEDIA

    In addition, the Anderson Gallery will host a free public symposium to explore a range of ethical issues that often go unexamined pertaining to the creation and use of digital technology. Four guest speakers will present at the symposium scheduled from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 15, in the Patty and Fred Turner Jazz Center.

    Guest speakers include:
    John Craig Freeman, artist and professor of New Media Art at Emerson College in Boston, Mass., discussing augmented reality and the pros and cons of its ability to create markers of events in contested locations such as the Mexican/ US border;

    Steve Tomasula, novelist, critic and professor of English at Notre Dame University, in Notre Dame, Ind., discussing access to digital technology and his decision to write books specifically and solely for iPads;

    Dorothy Santos, writer, editor and curator based in San Francisco, discussing gender issues—especially the dearth of women—in authoritative positions in the design of digital technology;

    Roopika Risam, digital humanities and postcolonial scholar and assistant professor of English at Salem State University in Salem, Mass., on the intersections of social cultural with digital humanities, especially postcolonial and racial aspects of these intersections.

  • OCTOBER 2 - NOVEMBER 15 - AMERICAN GUN SHOW

    OCTOBER 2 - NOVEMBER 15 - AMERICAN GUN SHOW

    Curatorial Statement

    The gun is a thousand year old technology changed by contemporary prototyping and communication processes. The American Gun Show looks at cultural responses in the context of personal liberty at the intersection of our identity, as Americans, and relationship to the network and print-on-demand technologies. Cody Wilson designed a 3D printable single shot pistol in 2013 which he posted as a computer file online for the public. Within days the U.S. State Department demanded that the files be taken down. This dispute marks a significant event in both legal and technological history – the collision of the first and second amendments of the US Constitution. Free speech and personal liberty become central themes to The American Gun Show.

    This exhibition is about the artists’ response to guns and, to a lesser extent, the design and aesthetics of the machine itself. The art and technology of guns as an objective focus for this exhibition has been a challenging one to meet, but the much needed dialogue around an object rife with cultural, social, and political meaning warrants examination through a multi-faceted lens. This show is an exploration of the American psyche and history steeped by gun violence. What is the political will of the American public to address the issues related this advanced form of weaponry? As curators, we explored artists, artistic practices, and expressions that can offer a form of neutrality or balanced perspectives on the issue of gun creation and control.

    We understand and expect a wide array of reactions to the content and nature of the exhibition. To that end, people will find some of the work offensive or antagonist to either side of the debate. But we ask visitors to consider the work that resonates with them may have the same or different effect on another viewer. The American Gun Show is not anti-gun or pro-gun. Rather, the show seeks to drive more of a census on what can bring opposing viewpoints stemming from the existence of this object as a point of departure for effective legislation while respecting the rights of American citizens.

    ~ James Morgan and Dorothy Santos, curators

  • FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2015 - IN CONVERSATION WITH ARTIST AND ACTIVIST MABEL NEGRETE

    FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2015 - IN CONVERSATION WITH ARTIST AND ACTIVIST MABEL NEGRETE

    When: Friday, August 7th from 5:00pm - 7:30pm
    Where: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, 701 Mission Street,
    San Francisco, California 94103
    Who: In conversation with Mabel Negrete
    Cost: FREE!

    We all carry the burden of punishment in our everyday lives. But at the economic, social, and cultural level, these burdens remain invisible. Whether they are through the taxes we pay perpetuating the prison industrial complex to surveillance technologies, we live in a world where we are unable to truly navigate away from digital and physical landscapes without consequence. Mabel Negrete coined the term ‘invisible punishing machines’ as a response to narratives around imprisonment, political oppression, and systems of government. Her work relies on vulnerability, storytelling, and experiential practices that have resulted in works such as The Weight I Carry (2010 - Ongoing) to her founding the research initiative Counter Narrative Society (CNS). The breadth of her work has served as an impactful project that aims to reverse dominant narratives that diminish the untold and often obscured stories of underrepresented and vulnerable populations.

    As a culmination of the public programming associated with the current Room for Big Ideas project, Conceiving Place, Bay Area-based writer Dorothy Santos will be in conversation with Negrete on her work and ask questions that focus on social practice, defining place, current social and political climates, as well as how the project has evolved since its inception. The conversation will be for one hour between artist and writer and 15–30 minutes of facilitated Q&A moderated by the writer.

    Find out more here

  • SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 2015 / NEXT DAY BETTER + SAN FRANCISCO / SPEAKER SERIES

    OUR EVENT MANIFESTO + THEME

    What will San Francisco look like in in 20 years? What does it look like now? What challenges does the city face? Considering the challenging issues that face San Francisco such as gentrification, poverty, digital and educational inequity, and entrepreneurship. We have asked our speakers to envision a new San Francisco based on history and their experiences. Building on the art of storytelling, each narrator will share what they feel needs to be built and what it will take to activate the community.

    WHERE: SoMa StrEat Food Park
    WHEN: Saturday, June 20th, 2015
    TIME: 1:00pm-6:00pm
    Drinks. Food. Inspiration

  • SATURDAY, MAY 2 to FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2015 / THE DISSIDENTS, THE DISPLACED, AND THE OUTLIERS TRANSBAY EXHIBITION

    SATURDAY, MAY 2 to FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2015 / THE DISSIDENTS, THE DISPLACED, AND THE OUTLIERS TRANSBAY EXHIBITION

    From Saturday May 2nd to Friday, June 19th the Bay Area Society for Art & Activism in partnership with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Random Parts, and Incline Gallery will present The Dissidents, the Displaced, and the Outliers, a transbay visual art exhibition about housing security and digital privacy at Random Parts in Oakland and Incline Gallery in San Francisco. Curated by Dorothy R. Santos, the exhibition will feature work in both venues by Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, Eliza Barrios, COLL.EO, Leslie Dreyer, Tom Loughlin, and Elizabeth Travelslight.

    In The Dissidents, the Displaced, and the Outliers, Bay Area artists offer a collection of work about the convergence of privacy and gentrification unique to the Bay Area, in particular the impact of surveillance technology and the digital economy on housing security and how affluence secures both privacy and housing.

    Historically, the artist has served as a figure who illuminates what is emblematic of the times serving as a luminary that provides the necessary historical, political, and cultural contexts that explains the significant shifts and changes within an environment. Since the emergence of dotcom businesses of the late 1990s, Bay Area residents have witnessed the rise and fall of the initial technology driven economy. The resurgence of online businesses and explosion of start-ups have resulted in exponential growth of the tech workforce across industry-leading companies such as Google, Facebook, and Twitter.

    This two-city parallel exhibition aims to open conversation about these topics on both sides of the Bay and is supported by free, public programming, including an outdoor film salon, a panel discussion with organizational partners and artists, and a workshop on digital privacy. These free community events enable visitors to delve further into the exhibition themes and be in dialogue with artists and community leaders.

    EXHIBITION PARTNERS

    Bay Area Society for Art & Activism – The Bay Area Society for Art & Activism is a diverse and intergenerational community celebrating the way artists and activists engage with issues of social justice, hope, freedom, history, democracy, love, labor, class, the environment and more. Our goal is to cultivate art and activism as vital regional values and to return creative, cultural and monetary resources to Bay Area artists, curators and activists so that they can continue to create the incredible work that makes the Bay Area a beacon of subversive, socially-engaged art and visionary grassroots activism. Emboldened by the wave of evictions in 2013 and the threat to art and activist communities presented by skyrocketing housing costs, the Bay Area Society for Art & Activism is working with our fiscal sponsor, SOMArts Cultural Center, to expand the reach and scope of our offerings and to deepen the claim of art and activism as essential features of San Francisco’s cultural landscape.

    PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

    Outdoor Film Salon – Random Parts – May 9 • 7-9pm
    The selection of short documentaries and artistic works shed light on the effects of gentrification on Bay Area residents and the stories behind the those that have been evicted as well as works reflecting on how technology and our connectivity to the rest of the world, quite literally, leaves many behind without resources and more questions in order to survive.

    EFF Digital Privacy Workshop – Random Parts – May 23 • 2-4pm
    This special workshop led by our friends at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a leading “nonprofit organization defending civil liberties in the digital world” aims to share knowledge and provide insight on encryption, data security, and the importance of digital privacy.

    Closing Panel Discussion – Incline Gallery – June 14 • 4-6pm
    Our special guests and esteemed panelists Nadia Kayyali (EFF), Erin McElroy (Anti-Eviction Mapping Project), Katherin Canton (Youth Arts Exchange and EAP), and Valeria Gress (Youth Arts Exchange Artist) have graciously accepted an invitation to present their experiences, observations, and work around the themes of the exhibition.

    EXHIBITION PARTNERS

    Bay Area Society for Art & Activism – The Bay Area Society for Art & Activism is a diverse and intergenerational community celebrating the way artists and activists engage with issues of social justice, hope, freedom, history, democracy, love, labor, class, the environment and more. Our goal is to cultivate art and activism as vital regional values and to return creative, cultural and monetary resources to Bay Area artists, curators and activists so that they can continue to create the incredible work that makes the Bay Area a beacon of subversive, socially-engaged art and visionary grassroots activism. Emboldened by the wave of evictions in 2013 and the threat to art and activist communities presented by skyrocketing housing costs, the Bay Area Society for Art & Activism is working with our fiscal sponsor, SOMArts Cultural Center, to expand the reach and scope of our offerings and to deepen the claim of art and activism as essential features of San Francisco’s cultural landscape.

    Electronic Frontier Foundation – The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading nonprofit organization defending civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, EFF champions user privacy, free expression, and innovation through impact litigation, policy analysis, grassroots activism, and technology development. We work to ensure that rights and freedoms are enhanced and protected as our use of technology grows. Even in the fledgling days of the Internet, EFF understood that protecting access to developing technology was central to advancing freedom for all. In the years that followed, EFF used our fiercely independent voice to clear the way for open source software, encryption, security research, file sharing tools, and a world of emerging technologies. Today, EFF uses the unique expertise of leading technologists, activists, and attorneys in our efforts to defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, advocate for users and innovators, and support freedom-enhancing technologies.

    Random Parts – Random Parts is an artist–run project space based in a small storefront in the Eastlake neighborhood of Oakland, California. Our vision is to give international, national and local multidisciplinary artists a platform without distinctions among well-known, self-taught and underexposed. We believe that these value judgments are a product of the commercial and educational art systems which emphasize career strategies rather than the complexities of a sustained art practice. By leveling the playing field, we see Random Parts as an equalizer – aiming to showcase provocative and challenging art in an approachable environment in hopes of engaging the public and promoting critical thinking, dialogue, and risk taking.

    Incline Gallery – Incline Gallery is an alternative art space that fosters relationships between community and artists. We create opportunities for emerging as well as established artists to exhibit in a non-cube format that challenges and encourages experimentation in exhibition design. Our role continues to expand by facilitating outside curators, international exchanges and partnerships within a community-based organization.

    CONTACTS

    Bay Area Society for Art & Activism – Dorothy R. Santos and Elizabeth Travelslight

    Electronic Frontier Foundation – Nadia Kayyali

    Random Parts – Colleen Flaherty and Juan Carlos Quintana

    Incline Gallery – Christo Oropeza

  • THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 2015 - BLACK + BROWN LIVES MATTER PERFORMANCE + DIALOGUE SERIES: DISRUPTIONS – MULTIMEDIA + SPOKEN WORD OPEN

    Curated by Mark Sabb and Michael Warr

    disruptions will feature writing, spoken word, and digital / multimedia art relevant to the Black + Brown Lives Matter movements. The program will present multimedia works ranging from short experimental video to traditional “poetry films” that fit the theme.

    Dialogue: 6pm
    Screenings / Open Mic: 7:30pm-10pm
    This is a free event.

    disruptions is part of the year-long Black + Brown Lives Matter Performance + Dialogue Series featuring performances, exhibits, discussions, and actions led by artivists, community organizers and residents of neighborhoods addressing engaged social change and gentrification. These monthly presentations and activities will provide an opportunity to interact directly with activists connected to the #BlackLIVESMatter, #QTPOCLiberation, #BlackandBrownLivesMatter, #ShutDownCastro and #AsiansforBlackLivesMatter and other segments of the movement and community. The series is facilitated by the Red Poppy Resident Artist Cohort in collaboration with the “Ubuntu: Can Art Save a Community?” documentary and book project.

    Panelists will include:

    Kwan Booth is a creative writer, journalist and media futurist focusing on the intersection of communications, community, art and technology. He is the editor of the anthology Black Futurists Speak and his creative writing has been published in CHORUS, Beyond the Frontier: African American Poets for the 21st Century, and the Journal for Pan African Studies.

    Dorothy R. Santos is a writer, editor, and curator whose research areas and interests include new media and digital art, programming, the internet, augmented reality, online performance, gaming, open source culture, and political aesthetics. Born and raised in San Francisco, California, she holds Bachelor’s degrees in Philosophy and Psychology from the University of San Francisco, and received her Master’s degree in Visual and Critical Studies at the California College of the Arts.

    www.dorothysantos.com

    Mark Sabb is a Bay Area based digital artist and designer. Using the internet as his medium Mark’s works, which range from films, graphic and web design, to curating art exhibitions, have been featured on some of the most prominent independent music and art publications on the web ranging from Complex.com to Gallery Online for his work with the FELT art collective.

    http://mark.feltzine.us/

    Learn more here

  • TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 2015 - SFAQ [PROJECT] SPACE

    April 21, 2015
    Doors: 6 pm
    Talk: 7–8 pm

    Dorothy Santos, Emily Holmes, and Quinn Norton

    Is It Global? seeks to complicate the idea of “the user” in an increasingly interconnected world. While the internet is a truly international and interoperable infrastructure of undersea cables, server farms, and data centers, there remains a multitude of users; of people online. While decisions about the net’s future often come from Silicon Valley, they are increasingly enforced on millions in Africa and Asia. Who is benefiting the most? How do we change the net to most benefit these new users? Is It Global? begins to ask how race, gender, sexual identity, physical location, and more changes our experience of the internet.

    SFAQ[Project]Space
    449 O’Farrell St.
    San Francisco, CA 94102
    Friday–Saturday, 11–5:30pm
    Learn more here

  • SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 2015 - THEORIZING THE WEB, MODERATOR

    Honored to moderate the panel on embodiment at the Theorizing the Web 2015 conference.

    Here's a little bit about the objective of the conference:

    "Theorizing the Web is an inter- and non-disciplinary annual conference that brings together scholars, journalists, artists, activists, and commentators to ask conceptual questions about the interrelationships between the web and society. We deeply value public engagement, and consider insights from academics, non-academics, and non-“tech theorists” alike to be equally valuable."

    Learn more about Theorizing the Web here

  • ARTIST TALK, APRIL 16, 2015 - LITTLE PAPER PLANES ARTIST TALK

    Where: Adobe Bookshop
    When: Thursday, April 16 - Starts at 8:00 PM

    Dorothy Santos is a SF based writer, editor, and curator whose research areas and interests include new media and digital arts, computational aesthetics, programming, coding, open source culture, contemporary art, and activism.

    Santos will use the her April 2015 LPP+ residency as a way to engage with the public and learn more about how new media and digital arts is viewed and perceived.

    Learn more here

  • CONVERGE: FOODIE

    Where: Grand Lobby of the Galleries and Forum Building
    When: Date: Thursday, March 19 - Starts at 4:00 PM

    In conjunction with the exhibition A Special Curatorial Project with Rirkrit Tiravanija: The Way Things Go

    Co-hosted by artist Michael Arcega, March's ConVerge invites Bay Area artists Sita Bhaumik, Eliza Barrios, Taraneh Hemami, Xandra Ibarra, Kenneth Lo, Dorothy Santos, Alex Wang, Rafael Vieira, Jenifer Wofford, and others to bring their best foodie selves and favorite meals to a communal gathering where the public can engage with foods, ideas, and residues that introduce the histories of post-colonial, diaspora communities. Admission to A Special Curatorial Project Rirkrit Tiravanija: The Way Things Go is free during ConVerge and uncovers narratives, reveals personal stories, and shares vignettes that lead to a larger understanding of migration in the production of material culture. Learn more here

  • SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2015 - PARTICIPANT IN WILLA KÖERNER'S PROJECT, SPECULATIVE FUTURISM

    PARTICIPATE: How do you see the future unfolding?

    Willa invites you to add your own HOPES and FEARS on Twitter to the Speculative Futurism project by using the #SpecFuturism hashtag.

    Visit this project online (link below). To see it unfold on Twitter, go to @SpecFuturism and on Tumblr at speculativefuturism.tumblr.com.

    The invited group of featured Speculative Futurism participants, whose HOPES and FEARS are featured in the spread’s illustration:

    Will Brown @awillbrown
    Alex Teplitzky @alexteplitzky
    Anna Muessig @annabike
    Annalee Newitz @annaleen
    Anthony Discenza @anthonydiscenza
    Barry Threw @barrythrew
    Bean Gilsdorf @beangilsdorf
    Ben Valentine @bennnyv
    Charles Cabbage @ccabbage2012
    Daniel Morgan @danielmorgan
    Dorothy Santos @deedottiedot
    Gregory Stock @theradiantbaby
    Guinevere de la Mare @zenguin
    Jeff Tidwell @prepop
    Jillian Steinhauer @jilnotjill
    Kara Q. Smith @karaqsmith
    Keir Winesmith @drkeir
    Ken Eklund @writerguygames
    Man Bartlett @manbartlett
    Morehshin Allahyari @morehshin
    Neal Stimler @nealstimler
    Olof Mathé @olofster
    Paolo Salvagione @salvagione
    Rachel Craft @rachcraft
    Sara Thacher @thacher
    Sarah Bailey Hogarty @sbhogarty
    Sheetal Prajapati @sdp80
    Tim Belonax @timbelonax
    Zoë Salditch @zoesalditch

    To read Willa's essay, please click here

  • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2014 - CRITICAL INFORMATION: 2014 A GRADUATE STUDENT CONFERENCE SPONSORED BY THE MFA ART CRITICISM & WRITING PROGRAM AT THE SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS (NEW YORK, NY)


    In December 2014, I have the great honor of presenting in New York! The city that not only doesn't sleep, but has given me so much incredible opportunity. I am thrilled to be a part of this conference.

    From the conference site,

    "The MFA program in Art Criticism & Writing at the School of Visual Arts (SVA) presents Critical Information, an interdisciplinary graduate student conference examining the contemporary dialogue between art, media, and society. The Critical Information conference provides a critical forum for current scholarship exploring the juncture of media, theory, criticism, and the visual arts. Boris Groys, Distinguished Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University and Senior Research Fellow at the Karlsruhe University of Arts, will deliver the keynote address, “Art on the Internet.”"

    To learn more, please visit the SVA Critical Information conference website here

  • NOVEMBER 8, 2014 - COLLABORATION, COMMUNITY, AND CRISIS: A ROUNDTABLE ON FILIPINO/AMERICAN ART NOW

    I will be sitting on a panel November 2014 with brilliant artists, curators, and scholars for the American Studies Association conference in Los Angeles regarding Filipino/American art and community engagement. Thea Quiary Tagle will be chairing the panel titled "Collaboration, Community, and Crisis: a Roundtable on Filipino/American Art Now". The panelists will be Jenifer Wofford, Eliza Barrios, Reanne Estrada, Lordy Rodriguez, Johanna Poethig, Sarita See, Jason Magabo Perez, and Raquel Gutiérrez!

    To learn more, please visit the American Studies Association website here

  • OCTOBER 18, 2014 - MEDITATIONS ON DIGGING: CREATIVE PRACTICE AND THEORIES OF FUTURE MAKING

    #MeditationsOnDigging encourages radical #civicengagement, artistic development, and creative expression within communities of color, particularly queer communities of color, while exploring a #futurist vision through #art

    Inspired by Amiri Baraka’s theories of illuminating the work of essentially African American art to build new futures, Meditations On Digging encourages civic engagement, artistic development, and creative expression within communities of color, particularly queer communities of color.

    Betti Ono curator, Anyka Barber, and AMEN artists, Amaryllis DeJesus Moleski and Carrie Y.T. khoLi. will be joined by community creators in a 1.5 hour panel discussing creative practice as a tool for radicalized civic engagement and future-making. They will be joined by Cayden Mak, Julio Salgado, and Dorothy Santos

    To learn more, visit the Betti Ono site

  • OCTOBER 4, 2014 - PANEL DISCUSSION AT YERBA BUENA CENTER FOR THE ARTS ~ ARTFUL MODELS: CREATIVE SOLUTIONS TO OUR CHANGING INDUSTRY

    Moderated by Rhiannon MacFayden, Founder, A Simple Collective
    Artists are tinkerers, rebuilders, inverters, and the do-it-yourselfers. Historically, artists have also been socioeconomic “canaries”—the first (vocal) casualties of financial and political wind-shifts. As our economies and communities change, and we continue to hemorrhage local artists, beloved nonprofits, and established galleries, creative “artrepreneurs” are finding new models to keep the industry, and their vision, thriving. We’ll ask some of these nimble innovators about their view of the current climate and what they’re doing to create solutions to our art-world problems.

    Panelists:
    * Danielle Siembieda-Gribben, The Art Inspector: from performance to business
    *Dorothy Santos, Grey Area Foundation: Discussing their big changes and why
    * Noah Weinstein, Autodesk Artist Residency: A symbiotic model for supporting artists while building technology
    * Rhiannon Evans MacFadyen, A Simple Collective + ASC Projects: An experiment in hybrid gallery models
    * Tim Roseborough, Artist “Meta-Practice”, art through marketing/marketing through art

    To learn more, visit this link

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  • SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 - STRATEGIES FOR SURVIVAL: DISCUSSIONS ON ARTIST'S SPACE IN THE BAY AREA

    Please join me at the Wattis Institute on May 10th from 2-4 pm at 360 Kansas Street in San Francisco. This is a free event and light snacks and refreshments will be provided.

    Strategies for Survival brings together local artists, arts workers, and attending audiences to present case studies on various tactics implemented by local art practitioners to maintain a creative practice in the San Francisco Bay Area. Participants include Erin McElroy, Dorothy Santos, and Emma Spertus & Mark Inglis Taylor.

    For more information, click here

  • SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2014, CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS VISUAL AND CRITICAL STUDIES SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    Presentation: MARGINALIZED NARRATIVES OF THE BODY IN CONTEMPORARY NEW MEDIA ARTS

    The disruption of mainstream media such as radio, mobile, and Internet technologies provides a unique platform to expose obscure or silenced narratives on the periphery of the dominant culture. In the work of Micha Cárdenas, the relationship between bodies and interactive new media works becomes a conduit for social, historical, and cultural transformation. In Cárdenas’s mixed-media augmented performance work Becoming Dragon (2009), the body’s relationship to physical and virtual realms becomes the imperceptible space where history materializes. The intersection between the body and media becomes a catalyst for deeper inquiry and exposition that explores the notion of Otherness through the mediation of images and sensory experiences.

    Find out more about the event here

  • FRIDAY, APRIL 11, 2014 - TALK AT THE DE YOUNG MUSEUM

    I will be in conversation with artist-in-residence, Tim Roseborough and Ben Valentine from Hyperallergic. We will be at the Kimball Education Gallery. It should be a great evening with wonderful dialogue about contemporary new media art practices and art criticism. Join us!

    Find out more about the event here