Materiality/Immateriality – The Art of Elyse Hochstadt

Oil Rig, gelatin transfer print, Day 1 by Elyse Hochstadt
Oil Rig, gelatin transfer print, 4 Weeks Later by Elyse Hochstadt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re familiar with some of my earlier posts, you would know one of my art crushes is Elyse Hochstadt.

I’ve been following Ms. Hochstadt’s work and happy to report that she will be showing work at Root Division at the Manufactured Organic show! Much of her recent work focuses heavily on materiality and immateriality. The beauty lies in the fact that much of her work takes patience due to the material transforming and morphing into an artifact. If you are free on the Saturday, March 12 from 7-10 pm, please show your support.

Zimoun at the Gray Area Foundation

How is it possible that something synthetic can create sounds you hear in nature (rain falling for example)?

Zimoun’s kinetic sculptures simulate the organized chaos that runs our world. The hum of machines, the noises we hear on a daily basis. He seems to conjure up what is natural through his sculptural work that is composed of nothing but man-made material. It’s amazing, his depth for knowing how to create such order with a keen awareness and appeal to both auditory and visual senses. His work is meditative. Imagine Tara Donavon but with a soundtrack. I’m just bummed I missed his show at the Gray Area Foundation for the Arts. I’m on a mission now…track down an exhibition and/or travel to one of his shows (amongst many other Art related To-Dos). His is definitely a must see.

Art and technology make a great pair

Technology on its own just isn’t as fun. It needs art. To some extent, I do agree with the following…

The production of too many useful things results in too many useless people. ~Karl Marx

Artists are extremely USEFUL people.

Traditional art meet Digital Art. Be nice.

[Traditional Art enters the room]

Dorothy (DS): Hey Traditional!! I’m glad you could make it. I really wanted you to meet my friend, Digital. I know you’ve heard a lot about her. She’s amazing! Just like you!

Traditional: I don’t know about this. I’ve heard a lot about Digital. She moves way too fast. I mean, all those connections. Who knows where all those wires have been?! Are you sure this is a good idea? I’m okay with all the painters and sculptors, you know. They like me but it is starting to get a bit boring from time to time. Oh, I had some time and passed by this exhibition where your voice controlled the piece! Crazy chaotic drawing that looked like a bunch of blind contours. Anyway, it was pretty cool. Look, I don’t want to give up all my drawing and painting and I just got into sculpture. You’re right though. I need to connect with more people. This is still scary for me. You know how shy I am. I still don’t know about this. What if she doesn’t like me?!?

[Traditional, nervously, steps away to retrieve her sketchbook and pencils to doodle for a bit]

DS to Traditional: Don’t take too long. She’s gonna be here any minute now.

[DS, quickly, walks to the monitor and sees Digital]

DS to Digital: Heya Digital!! [We exchange emoticons. Our waves are in slow motion so it’s faster to send a smiley face with teeth! Yes, this meeting is virtual. What did you expect?]. How have you been? I haven’t seen you in like, oh, I don’t know, 2 minutes! That’s a long time!!

Digital: I know, right? So, yeah, I’ve gotta get back to connecting the world but I know you’ve been wanting to introduce me to someone? Where is she? You told me she’s classic. You know how I love perennial style. I’m getting hard pressed by all the ladies who swing all these gigs and fancy script around. It takes more than code and all these fancy pimped out externals to get me going. I don’t mind slowing things down a bit too. I’ve got a soft spot for craftiness, an affinity for Olympia typewriters. Yeah, you know what I mean, right? Oh, if I could draw with some pencils without all these vectors and Wacom tablets. I don’t know. I’m starting to feel like Data from Star Trek.

DS to Digital: Oh, umm, hold on a second.

[DS moves away from the monitor and has TA take a seat in front of the monitor]

DS Voice: Traditional meet Digital. Digital meet Traditional.

TA and DA [simultaneously]: Ummm, hi.

Will they get together? Will their lines get crossed? Who knows?!? This is only the beginning…stay tuned. Yes…I had an imaginary friend when I was growing up. I’ll try to make the next installment a juicy one! 😉

I am located in 37:47:36N 122:33:17W

Artist: Trevor Paglen

Art writer, Christopher Knight wrote an entry for his Los Angeles Times blog, Culture Monster, about artist Trevor Paglen last September. His work has been unforgettable since then. Chronicles of satellites and planes doing reconnaissance work in the night sky play an intriguing yet integral part in our collective understanding of our (militaristic) history. Paglen’s work is allegorical and shows how modern technology can affect our understanding of topics such as politics, economics, and the act of seeing. I find myself much more engaged with history than ever before through his illuminating (pun intended) work. It was great seeing an interview on dailyserving.com about his current show.

…the sublime arises from those moments where we can sense that we cannot sense let alone understand something. This brings us to the “aesthetic” dimension of the work….Historically, aesthetics has often been linked to notions of freedom: ambiguity and the sublime can be quite powerful and is something visual art can be quite good at dealing with. So it’s important to me that it’s a part of my work, but the underlying “relational” and ethical aspects of the work are crucially important. Without them, it’s just pretty pictures. And there’s no reason to care about pretty pictures. ~Trevor Paglen

The work seems simple to understand. They’re photographs. What’s so difficult about understanding a photograph? Nothing too distressing to the retina. Yet, Paglen’s work takes patience, knowledge of the landscape, as well a desire to comprehend our relationships to these vast landscapes. Meshed with his scientific background in geography, the work serves as a marker of the unnatural way in which human movement and action are surveyed.

Southern Exposure’s Monster Drawing Rally

Southern Exposure (aka SOEX) is hosting the 2011 Monster Drawing Rally this Friday, February 25!

As I’ve mentioned, I’m such a doodler at heart. Drawing is not only cathartic but an opening to the imagination. Oh, where a line can take you. Now, for as low as $10, you can visit the Verdi Club in San Francisco’s Potrero Hill district and witness many of the Bay Area’s finest draftsmen and women draw their hearts out right in front of a live audience. If you’re not doing anything and want to help SOEX raise much-needed funds to keep their programs and gallery going, you will want to bring yourself and some friends to a night full of drawing and making new friends. You will LOVE it!