For fun, I googled “art writing” and the third result piqued my interest – 10 Writing Tips from the Masters (insert link to website here). However, to spare you some time, they are listed below:

  1. Cut the boring parts.
  2. Eliminate unnecessary words.
  3. Write with passion.
  4. Paint a picture.
  5. Keep it simple.
  6. Do it for love.
  7. Learn to thrive on criticism.
  8. Write all the time
  9. Write what you know…or, what you want to know.
  10. Be unique and unpredictable.

I have my own interpretation of the list, specifically, for art writing and criticism. Will post soon…

 

Stay...Be Brave

Unfortunately, my mind is completely blank, my body limp, and my heart numb due to some unforeseen circumstances.

Somehow, looking at art always makes me feel better. Even if it forces me to be contemplative.

Thanks for making me think Kara Hearn. If you ever read this, Kara, just know, today, although sad, surreal, and a mixed emotion kinda day,well, it all made a lot more sense to me after looking at your art. I mean that in a good way. Thank you.

Always,

E/IC Art Writer

Virtual Museums? Wow...

Everyone uses Google, well, almost everyone…

I know I use Google (as a search engine, my e-mail, etc.) so it was amazing to see their latest addition to the Google applications – Art Project! Granted, I’d much rather see the musuems of the world in person but if I can’t spend the money to go to Madrid, Paris, or London, I can pay AP a visit and see what is on exhibit!

I’ll have to explore and ruminate about this one. I’m wondering if Google will try to get a prominent museum from all countries. Oh, the possibilities and, oh, the poor artists. These days, artists will truly be on a world stage (and THAT has its own advantages and disadvantages). More thoughts to follow…

Dennis Oppenheim’s, Device to Root Out Evil, 1997
 

I just read something sad. An artist died. It was Dennis Oppenheim.

Mr. Oppenheim went to the California College of the Arts (Oakland, CA) and received his MFA at Stanford. Then, like many artists, he moved to New York to pursue his art career and practice. His art work is grandiose and forces you to move in the environment differently than you normally would. I heard of him but never had the opportunity to study his work more intimately. Now, I feel compelled to do so.

Perhaps, that’s why I’m saddened by the art world’s loss. Artists are always posthumously recognized by the the rest of the world. Even if you eat, sleep, and breath art, it’s difficult to know everything and everyone and all the art movements (yes, there are TONS). Yet, I feel consolation in the fact that artists are probably the only types of human beings that create the most substantial artifacts of our civiliations within a lifetime. With such large scale work that is undoubtedly present and created with such magnitude, well, that’s quite impressive.

You can read The New York Times article here.