I’m looking at light from 13.5 Billion years ago at the Wire + Nail Gallery

Today, I had the opportunity to look at Luca Nino Antonucci’s work from his current show, COLLAPSE, at the Wire + Nail Gallery (San Francisco, CA) showing until August 21, 2011. The content of the show is based on light from 13.5 billion years ago. Using advanced photographic technology, which includes an infrared camera along with a multi object spectrometer indicating distance, Antonucci creates an array of paper based work that illuminates (pun intended) what the human eye is unable to see, perhaps, even fathom. The show is accompanied by a book project created in collaboration with Daniel R. Small called “First Light” that explains, in laymen’s terms, the process behind the art. The show itself is a great example of what can be done with photography when an artist uses it to create something seemingly unimaginable and enigmatic. Yes, you have to think about the work and not just look. It begs the viewer to wonder, which is the beauty behind the work. Although the viewer is well aware of light’s inevitable demise, there’s an amorous and sentimental feeling gleaned from the work.

My favorite pieces from COLLAPSE: The White Embossments of Star Clusters *sigh*

Learn more about Luca’s work by visiting his website here.

2 thoughts on “I’m looking at light from 13.5 Billion years ago at the Wire + Nail Gallery

  1. As a writer, a poet, who frequently latches to a sense of wonder, I have appreciation for this project, this collaboration. In searching for an original source, recognizing light, even a generic spark, I am led by the idea, alone.

    Just a quick glance through online identities of the said collaborators does nothing to stop the enigmatic swing. Here I am, constructing the conversation that began this process (in my mind). Recognizing the exceptionality of a grand idea, a template rises, like dust blown from an unearthed map.

    Your description, Dorothy, enhances the mission of the moment. Your use of the word “amorous” to qualify the sensitivity of the work, signals a literal luminescence for those of us unable to travel at the speed of light to be there with you. All puns intended.

    1. Yes! Great comment, indeed. I think this is why I used the adjective ‘amorous’ because there is something wonderful about the idea of seeing the source or the origin and of something intangiable.

      “Your description, Dorothy, enhances the mission of the moment. Your use of the word “amorous” to qualify the sensitivity of the work, signals a literal luminescence for those of us unable to travel at the speed of light to be there with you. All puns intended”. – Your entire comment made me smile but this just warmed me. 🙂 Thanks again, Liz for being so supportive of my work and understanding of the world. I’ve very grateful.

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