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Please help spread the word about my friend and artist, Stephen Stout’s, latest work, The Nothing Box. You can learn more about his project and how you can help him meet his goal via his Kickstarter page by clicking here. Stephen’s video goes into the inspiration for the piece, the making of The Nothing Box, and the overall concept. The completion date of this large-scale installation is scheduled for November 2011. It’s an incredible piece and I’m a backer on the project! Hoping you can help out (even a $1 helps believe it or not) AND if you are unable to aid financially, please think about passing the information to your friends and family. 🙂

Today, I had the opportunity to look at Luca Nino Antonucci’s work from his current show, COLLAPSE, at the Wire + Nail Gallery (San Francisco, CA) showing until August 21, 2011. The content of the show is based on light from 13.5 billion years ago. Using advanced photographic technology, which includes an infrared camera along with a multi object spectrometer indicating distance, Antonucci creates an array of paper based work that illuminates (pun intended) what the human eye is unable to see, perhaps, even fathom. The show is accompanied by a book project created in collaboration with Daniel R. Small called “First Light” that explains, in laymen’s terms, the process behind the art. The show itself is a great example of what can be done with photography when an artist uses it to create something seemingly unimaginable and enigmatic. Yes, you have to think about the work and not just look. It begs the viewer to wonder, which is the beauty behind the work. Although the viewer is well aware of light’s inevitable demise, there’s an amorous and sentimental feeling gleaned from the work.

My favorite pieces from COLLAPSE: The White Embossments of Star Clusters *sigh*

Learn more about Luca’s work by visiting his website here.

Artist: Trevor Paglen

Art writer, Christopher Knight wrote an entry for his Los Angeles Times blog, Culture Monster, about artist Trevor Paglen last September. His work has been unforgettable since then. Chronicles of satellites and planes doing reconnaissance work in the night sky play an intriguing yet integral part in our collective understanding of our (militaristic) history. Paglen’s work is allegorical and shows how modern technology can affect our understanding of topics such as politics, economics, and the act of seeing. I find myself much more engaged with history than ever before through his illuminating (pun intended) work. It was great seeing an interview on dailyserving.com about his current show.

…the sublime arises from those moments where we can sense that we cannot sense let alone understand something. This brings us to the “aesthetic” dimension of the work….Historically, aesthetics has often been linked to notions of freedom: ambiguity and the sublime can be quite powerful and is something visual art can be quite good at dealing with. So it’s important to me that it’s a part of my work, but the underlying “relational” and ethical aspects of the work are crucially important. Without them, it’s just pretty pictures. And there’s no reason to care about pretty pictures. ~Trevor Paglen

The work seems simple to understand. They’re photographs. What’s so difficult about understanding a photograph? Nothing too distressing to the retina. Yet, Paglen’s work takes patience, knowledge of the landscape, as well a desire to comprehend our relationships to these vast landscapes. Meshed with his scientific background in geography, the work serves as a marker of the unnatural way in which human movement and action are surveyed.