Farhad Bahram. Reciprocality (2012); color photograph; 4 x 12 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

It has been too long since my last Shotgun Review for Art Practical! I wrote about In the Current show, which showcases some phenomenal Iranian artists! Below, you will find my write-up. Please enjoy and I highly recommend stopping by the exhibit. Enjoy!

*          *          *          *

In the Currents, an exhibition of Iranian-American artists curated by Taraneh Hemami and Lucy Kalyani Lin, complicates and makes personal the ways in which Iran and Iranian culture are portrayed in much of Western media.

In Azin Seraj’s video installation, kaseye sabr labriz mishavad (bowl of patience, 2012), four Iranians speak about how their lives have been affected by the United Nations sanctions against Iran. Seraj layers the footage of the speakers with that of droplets of water filling a bowl, creating contorted and muddled images of the speakers, though their voices are clearly heard. Curiously, the visual rippling effect forces a viewer to concentrate on the intonation of words—even though only Farsi-speaking viewers are likely to understand them.

Farhad Bahram’s piece, Reciprocal Subject (2012), also complicates the view of its subjects. Like Seraj, Bahram empowers the subjects and makes them anonymous, but  they share in the creation of the work. Bahram and each subject simultaneously took pictures of each other in open public spaces, and Bahram arranged the resulting color photos on a board in an apparent order or system that mimics a scrapbook, with names appearing beside each photo. Each of the faces is partially obscured by a camera, frustrating any viewer’s desire to identify the subjects. The public spaces that serve as backdrops add an additional level of neutrality and anonymity. Still, there is a complicity that only exists between Bahram and each subject, leaving viewers curious about their relationship.

Another notable piece, Flag (2012), from Sanaz Mazinani’s series “Conference of the Birds,” uses photographic images to create a patterned flag reflective not of a particular region but of a specific idea. Her flag is rooted in solidarity as opposed to being grounded in a specific physical location. The repeated images coalesce to form a tightly knit pattern that creates a visual mesh of people, places, and cultures. Mazinani’s work, along with that of Seraj and Barham, blurs the expected lines of perception and demands that viewers participate in the act of seeing not only their works but also their culture.

IN THE CURRENTS IS ON VIEW AT THE ASIAN RESOURCE CENTER GALLERY, IN OAKLAND, THROUGH JUNE 15, 2012.

Original posted to Shotgun Reviews on Art Practical, please click here to view.

What is Curation? from Percolate on Vimeo.

Brooklyn based Creatives, m ss ng p eces, created a video (for Percolate) asking some of the top information gatherers or content curators what curation looks like in our highly globalized and heavily virtual, interactive, internet based world. It’s definitely important for someone like me who wants to hone my writing, physical/virtual curatorial skills, and overall ability to research.

EDICOLA
OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE

This March 15th, 2012, marks the opening of a reinvention of the traditional newsstand.

Colpa Press will partner with the Central Market Street Revitalization Program to create a venue for artist books, prints, and albums, on the corner of Market and 6th Street.

Edicola is dedicated to providing a platform for emerging artists to reach their community through support from the public and by repurposing a kiosk that would otherwise be vacant. The stand will feature artists and musicians, both local and international, who work with the print format. It will focus on work that pushes the independent publishing envelope, through creative strategies of printing paired with high concept work.

As funds are made available, Colpa Press, will choose a local artist every month, to publish, and his or her work will be featured at the kiosk. Colpa will also choose an artist to design a poster for Edicola, every month, and this poster will be made available exclusively at the kiosk.

Additionally, Colpa Press, will publish a monthly newspaper featuring artists that are new to the kiosk, art and music reviews, including new music features from Aquarius records, as well as market street news and local events. Edicola is set on challenging the current state of publishing and suggesting that we are far from the death of print. Through this program, independent press can receive the stimulus it needs to be revitalized and flourish.

Edicola’s hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:00 am – 6:00 pm beginning March 15th.
To learn more, you can click here

Hope to see you there!
Luca and Carissa of Colpa Press

Pretty exciting to blog on the fly! I’m currently at the Get Lucky: The Culture of Chance opening night. Many people and such a great line up of wonderful artists looking at chance while paying homage to art icon, John Cage! More to come… 20120106-182421.jpg

20120106-182542.jpg

20120106-182611.jpg

20120106-182651.jpg

20120106-182733.jpg

Check out essay, Project Projects: Slides, PowerPoints, Nostalgia, and a Sense of Belonging

by Orit Gat on Rhizome.