32 ways to stay creative

There are probably way more than 33 ways but this list offers up some great ideas. This summer will be extra busy as I prep for a writing lab/intensive to make certain my prospectus (essentially a breakdown of my master’s thesis) will be in decent shape by the time I start my second year (this fall). Essentially, I’m conducting lit review for the next few months! This process entails reading, research, and a sh*tload of writing (crappy writing for the most part but this is what editing is all about!). I’m going into some really interesting directions, for sure. If you can believe it, I have yet another virtual space dedicated to my observations and experiences about school. But I have yet to update that space since the Fall 2012 semester. I’ll definitely share some academic stuff (i.e., favorite readings from my first year and the top 10 things I’ve learned).

For now, enjoy the list and get creative!!

Time-Out / Temps Mort by Ogrydziak / Prillinger Architects ~ Image Source: Ogrydziak / Prillinger Architects

A couple of weeks ago, I attended an Upgrade! SF meeting filled with artists, writers, theorists, and curators within the new media arts community. The evening was filled with conversation around Chance Operations and stochastic methods related to the art making process. Luke Ogrydziak, principal architect at Ogrydziak / Prillinger Architects gave a brief talk around chance in the architecture and design processes. His presentation touched heavily on the idea of indeterminable factors affecting a final outcome or product. For instance, some of the objects constructed through C++ programming language. Although there is an element of precision through the computation, the digital environment also allows for chance to create sculptural pieces such as Time-Out / Temps Mort (pictured). Specific constraints may prohibit physical and manual production of this piece but Chance Operations, with advancements in technology, allow for organic forms to emerge.

Matt Ganucheau, San Francisco based artist, views chance as a sterile aspect of the art making process. Chance requires a bit of action. He stated,

Chance is a stimulant that requires an agent and a seed. Once you increase the production, you begin to see repeat occurrences, thus chance increases. It is always apart of the process but only through repetition do we see its potential.

Another interesting point brought up during the evening was the intent of an artist. Intention plays a major role in how chance is revealed. It’s one thing for an artist to work in solitude and engage in experimentation strictly for oneself. It’s a completely different story and outcome when the artist relinquish control of production and leaves chance up to the viewer thus making them a producer. Essentially, everything produced within an art practice and process still requires calculation and precision. Regarding John Cage’s methods of art and music making, I’m curious how technology eliminates, illuminates, or adds yet another layer or modality of Chance. Even after acts and gestures are performed within an art practice, choice determines an outcome and not necessarily chance. I’m curious, as an artist, a writer, technologist, etc. what do you define as chance operations and how has it played a role in your practice and creative process?

Please log onto ZERO1’s Facebook page, make sure to “Like” us, and post your thoughts on Chance Operations.

Look for the following question and join the discussion, “With advancements in technology, from photography apps to programming language to 3D printing, are Chance Operations necessary in the art making process? Why or why not?”

Originally posted to ZERO1, please view the blog post here

Pretty exciting to blog on the fly! I’m currently at the Get Lucky: The Culture of Chance opening night. Many people and such a great line up of wonderful artists looking at chance while paying homage to art icon, John Cage! More to come… 20120106-182421.jpg

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Source Image: Artist's Website

To learn more about Nik’s work, please click here.

Currently working on a piece about Nik’s work. He’s an incredibly intelligent, talented, and humble guy. I couldn’t help but reflect on something he shared with me recently about Video and Programming (related to new media arts). Here’s what he said…

I am a big believer that work should perform and be as it is — that whatever phenomena that you are trying to describe be embedded in the work itself. But I also think that the somewhat anachronistic attributes of past media have a significant weight on how work can be put in conversations today.

~ Nik Hanselmann, Artist


What’s the biggest compliment (ever)?

Having your mentor say some really wonderful things about you. 🙂

Visual artist, Jenifer Wofford, was interviewed by artist and founder of Art of Hustle, Anthem Salgado a couple of months ago. Jenifer has been my mentor for the past few years and its been an incredible experience. Not only did she let me in on her art practice, experiences, knowledge-sharing about the art community, she helped me see my potential and all the possibilities around art writing and becoming an active member of the art community. Naturally, listening to the podcast, I was ridiculously honored when she mentioned our mentoring relationship during her interview and said some flattering things about me. It was such a phenomenal feeling.

Aside from Jenifer’s kind words and wisdom, once again, she introduced me to an invaluable resource – Anthem Salgado. I highly recommend you listen to his podcasts, read his posts, and access him via Twitter/RSS/Facebook ESPECIALLY if you’re an artist. Art of Hustle is fantastic and very much needed!!

To learn more about Jenifer Wofford’s work, click here to view her art portfolio and CV and here for her custom illustration and design site.

Click on the image below to visit Art of Hustle

Calamities of Nature, irreverent webcomics by Tony Piro
See more comics from Calamities of Nature

Calamities of Nature is one of those web comics you can’t deny. From science to politics to philosophical issues, the conversations between the cast of characters (Alp, Ferdinand, Harold, and Raymond) show the uncanny ability of creator, Tony Piro, to make abstract and esoteric ideas funny and palpable (yet still so incredibly intelligent and witty). The Artist and Audience comic strip came through this morning. Naturally, I couldn’t help but re-post for your viewing pleasure. In four frames, the Artist/Audience dynamic explained (and oh so cleverly). Enjoy!