Since I did not have a reblog Monday this past week, I’m doing a Saturday morning reblog! He is a post regarding Southern Exposure’s public art grant program. You will definitely want to check it out if you have the time. Supporting the arts is good for the soul. 🙂

R+D

Southern Exposure’s public art grant program celebrates its first commission tonight! I was happy to supply a bit of 19th-century-inspired typography for the graphic design of the mailer (read the essay)….

Manifest Destiny! Reception
February 18, 20124:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Hotel des Arts, 447 Bush St, San Francisco, CA
soex.org/manifestdestiny

Jenny Chapman and Mark Reigelman’s Manifest Destiny! is a temporary rustic cabin occupying one of the last remaining unclaimed spaces of downtown San Francisco – above and between other properties. Using a 19th-century architectural style and vintage building materials, the structure is both homage to the romantic spirit of the Western Myth and a commentary on the arrogance of Westward expansion. The installation will remain in place and be slowly transformed by the elements through October 2012.

More info on soex.org.

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I’m a huge fan of Packard Jennings. He created yet another amazing project emblematic of our time – Destructables. Please click on the image below and check out the site. A wonderful resource for creative dissent!!!

Showing at Southern Exposure (SOEX) Gallery

Southern Exposure (aka SOEX) is hosting the 2011 Monster Drawing Rally this Friday, February 25!

As I’ve mentioned, I’m such a doodler at heart. Drawing is not only cathartic but an opening to the imagination. Oh, where a line can take you. Now, for as low as $10, you can visit the Verdi Club in San Francisco’s Potrero Hill district and witness many of the Bay Area’s finest draftsmen and women draw their hearts out right in front of a live audience. If you’re not doing anything and want to help SOEX raise much-needed funds to keep their programs and gallery going, you will want to bring yourself and some friends to a night full of drawing and making new friends. You will LOVE it!

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A few photos from Southern Exposure of Kenneth Lo’s exhibition, every stone tethered to sleep/every presence wedded to stone

Everything is Nothing/Nothing is Everything, 2010, Granite, 31" x 24.5" x 12" - Artist: Kenneth Lo

Having a father that was significantly older than my mother (older than my maternal grandfather as a matter of fact) made for an interesting childhood. Many funerals were attended. More than any other kid I knew. That being said, there was a familiarity with all the little details that outfitted such an occasion. The headstone alone was the summation of a person’s life – Name, Birth and Death Date. Perhaps, for the living (and, if money permit), an epitaph accompanied with etchings of roses or some serene landscape. It is safe for you to assume I know a thing or two about what is involved in the ritualistic aspects of burying a person and the act of commemoration. Kenneth Lo’s work is the whole package – intelligence, wit, humor, and correlation to universals. It’s undeniable quite frankly. Sure, the work may cater to one’s fascination with death and impermanence but it brings forth aspects of our daily lives we would often neglect or choose to forget. Lo’s work in his solo exhibition, every stone thethereed to sleep/every presence wedded to stone, 2011, showing at Southern Exposure Gallery (San Francisco, CA) addresses memory, ritual, loss, being/non-being, nothingness, and fixation.

Not everyone’s actions will be memorialized, bronzed, marbled or collected for posterity, but that does not detract from someone’s legacy. ~Michael Hall

One never really knows where thoughts and conversations go after all is said and done especially with technology giving the illusion that time moves faster than our physical existence. If one were to think about this, philosophically, time is linear, doesn’t change, and the adage is right – it, certainly, doesn’t wait for anyone. Although humans are constantly evolving, there is still that irrationality of permanence. With a rapidly evolving globalized world dictated, in many ways, by technology, Hall asserts that Lo, “…realizes that in the end, all the monuments, all the lists, the forget-me-nots, don’t mean a thing if no one remembers. After all, it’s often the small, significant moments we remember best.” It is even more impressive to turn the lens on oneself and disclose aspects of every day life that would otherwise be buried in the deep recesses of cyberspace.

With commemoration comes the choice of material. Lo’s use of granite and concrete lent itself extremely well to the ritualistic nature of burying the dead. It is the one physical thing that remains. It serves as a marker of life and truly universal. From a wooden cross to an elaborate gravestone, culture and tradition obliges us to place that physical marker at the end of life. Lo examines this act of morbidity by re-contextualizing and re-interpreting this ritual. The viewer is forced to read and remember these moments. A tombstone is synonymous with an end albeit a tangible artifact of a life lived but for Mr. Kenneth Lo, this exhibition has exuberantly breathed new life (pun very much intended) into our collective understanding of modern life that is completely worth the examination.

He is one to follow.