With Valentine’s day just around the corner (and, yes, I’m excited, I love the day and don’t care if you don’t), I felt compelled to write about interconnectedness. That lost love, that forgettable love, or that unrequited love in your life all seem to hit people at once on the red-and-pink-heart-chocolate-laden day. So, I wanted to lead you to one of Stephanie Syjuco’s older works that shows Interconnectedness in a much more intimate way. In a sexy way, if you ask me.

Her work, “Interpersonal Relationships Based on Fact, Rumor, or Hearsay, and Depicted as Either Molecular Compositions or Constellation Maps (To the Best of My Knowledge), 2003” charted relationships in the Bay Area art scene. However you want to perceive those relationships, it’s up to you but she does a brilliant job at making you wonder and looking at our connections differently. I never grow tired of her work. You can view the chart here.

More lovey-dovey, interconnected, mushy art related stuff to follow…xoxo

A few weeks ago, my girlfriend and I went to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and watched Rottenberg’s new work entitled, Squeeze (2010). I titled part of my entry as ‘Interdependence’ because, coincidentially, I’ve been reading about interdepedence with others (and, even with inantimate objects) through a Buddhist lens and trying to incorporate that awareness within a meditative practice. Not only does Mika Rottenberg’s new work showcase the notion of interdependence, her entire body of work intermingles body image, use of the body, consumerism and labor. The women she incorporates into her film work (just to note, these women are not actresses) evoke gesture in such a way that is not only ritualistic but shows an end product in the ritualistic gestures and the women are, not only connected to each other, but to the viewer. Meticulsouly and brilliantly edited video installations create surreal manufacturing worlds for us to visually explore. In that viewing, the observer may see their connection to these women they watch. Hence, me bringing in the notion of interdependence because it is woven into her work seamlessly. She’s definitely an artist worth following. Even more noteworthy, she was a Whitney Biennele artist in 2008. I’m glad I found her sooner as opposed to later…

You can learn more about Mika Rottenberg here