bodyfuck: gestural brainfuck interpreter. “HI” from nik hanselmann on Vimeo.

This is an artist you need to keep you eye on…seriously. His name is Nik Hanselmann.

 

Art relies on the body as a means to produce. Painting and sculpting are overt examples of the solitary and traditional artist. As the world grows more interconnected through the internet and mobile devices, new media artists are finding ways to incorporate the body as a means of art production. The viewer becomes the participant in the art making. Scott Snibbe takes gesture to an incredible new meaning. From immersive environments to Björk’s latest all app album Biophillia, Snibbe redefines art, technology, interactivity, and connectivity.

At recent UpgradeSF! meeting, Snibbe gave an artist talk and presented well known works including, Björk’s all app album, Gravilux, and Oscilloscoop. Although the aforementioned are applications meant for mobile devices, Snibbe’s larger installations entail use of the entire body to create works that emphasize articulations of the body to construct unique experiences for each viewer. As Snibbe discussed his philosophy and practice, the presentation brought an interesting quandary. Is the new media artist able to divorce language from their work? With language playing an imperative role in creative coding, is this one of the hurdles new media arts present to the general public regarding the definition and evolution of art?

Originally published to zero1 blog. Please view post here

A few weeks ago, my girlfriend and I went to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and watched Rottenberg’s new work entitled, Squeeze (2010). I titled part of my entry as ‘Interdependence’ because, coincidentially, I’ve been reading about interdepedence with others (and, even with inantimate objects) through a Buddhist lens and trying to incorporate that awareness within a meditative practice. Not only does Mika Rottenberg’s new work showcase the notion of interdependence, her entire body of work intermingles body image, use of the body, consumerism and labor. The women she incorporates into her film work (just to note, these women are not actresses) evoke gesture in such a way that is not only ritualistic but shows an end product in the ritualistic gestures and the women are, not only connected to each other, but to the viewer. Meticulsouly and brilliantly edited video installations create surreal manufacturing worlds for us to visually explore. In that viewing, the observer may see their connection to these women they watch. Hence, me bringing in the notion of interdependence because it is woven into her work seamlessly. She’s definitely an artist worth following. Even more noteworthy, she was a Whitney Biennele artist in 2008. I’m glad I found her sooner as opposed to later…

You can learn more about Mika Rottenberg here