It is wrong to say that in philosophy we consider an ideal language as opposed to our ordinary one. For this makes it appear as though we thought we could improve on ordinary language. But ordinary language is all right. Whenever we make up ‘ideal languages’ it is not in order to replace our ordinary language by them; but just to remove some trouble cause in someone’s mind by thinking that he has got hold of the exact use of a common word. That is also why our method is not merely to enumerate actual usages of words, but rather deliberately to invent new ones, some of them because of their absurd appearance.

~Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosopher

Revisiting the questions in The Body Organic – Part I, does the new media artist have the ability to divorce language from their work?

The complex, universal, and abstract ideas simplified in Snibbe’s work capture the beauty of nature through beautiful calculation and minimalist design. Physical presence and engagement are integral to the overall experience of the art. Each experience is new. Yet, new media arts seems tethered to language. As Snibbe mentioned the limitations of language during an UpgradeSF artist talk, language is far too intertwined in new media, which presents an unprecedented challenge in redefining highly technological work as fine art. Although the body is a primary part in many new media art works and interactive pieces, the invention of new languages is imperative in the evolution of art and culture. Even with language having played a huge role in Dadaism and the Fluxus movement, the use of language in current new media arts creates an organic experience involving the senses and uses language to create image and interaction. As programmers, developers, and creative coders, the creation of platforms such as Processing enable artists to take language and create visual works but what happens when the limitation of language riddles the next wave of artists? The inescapable reliance on language (i.e., programming and coding) persists.

Originally published to zero1 blog. Please view post here

 

Art relies on the body as a means to produce. Painting and sculpting are overt examples of the solitary and traditional artist. As the world grows more interconnected through the internet and mobile devices, new media artists are finding ways to incorporate the body as a means of art production. The viewer becomes the participant in the art making. Scott Snibbe takes gesture to an incredible new meaning. From immersive environments to Björk’s latest all app album Biophillia, Snibbe redefines art, technology, interactivity, and connectivity.

At recent UpgradeSF! meeting, Snibbe gave an artist talk and presented well known works including, Björk’s all app album, Gravilux, and Oscilloscoop. Although the aforementioned are applications meant for mobile devices, Snibbe’s larger installations entail use of the entire body to create works that emphasize articulations of the body to construct unique experiences for each viewer. As Snibbe discussed his philosophy and practice, the presentation brought an interesting quandary. Is the new media artist able to divorce language from their work? With language playing an imperative role in creative coding, is this one of the hurdles new media arts present to the general public regarding the definition and evolution of art?

Originally published to zero1 blog. Please view post here

Screenshot of Scott Snibbe's McSweeney's piece, System of Space and Time ~ Click on the image above to learn more about Scott Snibbe Interactive

System of Space and Time by Scott Snibbe, 2011 from Dorothy Santos on Vimeo.

Here’s the post I referenced in the video regarding Scott Snibbe’s phenomenal work on Bjork’s latest (app) album!

Interactive media artist, researcher, and entrepreneur, Scott Snibbe’s latest work, Björk’s Biophilia App Album. Snibbe’s work not only speaks to the future of music that goes beyond listening, it showcases the possibilities of allowing the end-user to have a unique experience. Please view the video above and click here to learn more about the artist.