EDICOLA
OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE

This March 15th, 2012, marks the opening of a reinvention of the traditional newsstand.

Colpa Press will partner with the Central Market Street Revitalization Program to create a venue for artist books, prints, and albums, on the corner of Market and 6th Street.

Edicola is dedicated to providing a platform for emerging artists to reach their community through support from the public and by repurposing a kiosk that would otherwise be vacant. The stand will feature artists and musicians, both local and international, who work with the print format. It will focus on work that pushes the independent publishing envelope, through creative strategies of printing paired with high concept work.

As funds are made available, Colpa Press, will choose a local artist every month, to publish, and his or her work will be featured at the kiosk. Colpa will also choose an artist to design a poster for Edicola, every month, and this poster will be made available exclusively at the kiosk.

Additionally, Colpa Press, will publish a monthly newspaper featuring artists that are new to the kiosk, art and music reviews, including new music features from Aquarius records, as well as market street news and local events. Edicola is set on challenging the current state of publishing and suggesting that we are far from the death of print. Through this program, independent press can receive the stimulus it needs to be revitalized and flourish.

Edicola’s hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:00 am – 6:00 pm beginning March 15th.
To learn more, you can click here

Hope to see you there!
Luca and Carissa of Colpa Press

When I’m not thinking about the afterlife, I’m thinking about love. This is true. Currently live blogging at Wire + Nail Gallery for Carissa Potter’s opening, People I’ve Loved. One of my favorite artists.

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Four Poems of Love & a Sonnet of Despair by Carissa Potter

Hello friends and family!

If you find yourself roaming around San Francisco on Friday, February 10 not knowing what to do, please attend the opening for People I’ve Loved opening night at Wire + Nail Gallery in San Francisco’s Mission District. It will be a great show!! Please see the press release below for details!

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PRESS CONTACT:
Tricia Rampe, Curator
E-mail: tr@wireandnail.com
Telephone: (415) 645-3805
Web: http://wireandnail.com/

WIRE AND NAIL GALLERY PRESENTS, People I’ve Loved

Exhibition runs: Friday, February 10, 2012 – Friday, March 16, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, February 10, 2012 7PM -9PM
3150 18th Street (at Treat Avenue), Suite 104, San Francisco, CA 94110
Gallery hours: By Appointment Only

Wire + Nail Gallery is pleased to present People I’ve Loved, a collection of multimedia installations, drawings, and video installation by Carissa Potter. Please join us on Friday, February 10, 2012 from 7-9pm for the exhibition opening.

In a world filled with cynicism and despair, a lover of love in the arts is a rarity. Contemporary art often veers away from love as a subject matter. If love does find its way into an artwork, there’s a strong sense of irony or flippant use of the word and idea. Yet, with the perfect combination of authenticity and playfulness, Carissa Potter showcases the nature of amorous human interactions in such an undeniably beguiling way. Introducing new works in this exhibition, Potter addresses the physical, emotional, psychological, and intellectual aspects of love and desire.

Potter introduces new works looking at the physical and emotional facets of love. Marry Me on Market is performance based piece where the artist conducts impromptu commitment ceremonies on one of the most highly trafficked streets in San Francisco. The participation requires one to be fearless and unafraid. While art work, All You Left Me, a necklace made from a human kidney stone calls to mind the belief in fetishes and amulets. Even though the necklace is all that is left, it serves a purpose. A reminder, a souvenir of love and loss. It marks a forgotten or remembered time. You Tell Me What I Want to Hear, interprets the game of Telephone within the context of love and longing. This piece serves as a playful look into how the our mind may perceive one thing but unable to trust what we actually hear. Finally, 5 Poems of Love and A Sonnet of Despair, by Pablo Nuerda serves as a metaphor to the way in which love may be understood. The longing to translate something enigmatic and realizing, through the translation, familiarity resides. Potter’s translations mimic the way love is felt, instantaneously and without regard to any concept of what is right or wrong but what is felt.

About the Artist

Carissa Potter is a person who lives in San Francisco, California. Carissa currently is working on her first solo show at Wire and Nail Gallery, in the past she has shown at SomArts, E6 Gallery, Kitsch Gallery, and Root Division. She has been a featured artist in Asterisk Magazine, Conveyor Arts Magazine, HoneyDove, Mauve Gallery Journal, Site95, and FFFound. Carissa is a founding member of Colpa Press, a concept based print operation. For more information about Carissa, visit http://www.carissapotter.com or http://www.colpapress.com. Thank-you for reading and have a nice day.

Learn more about Carissa Potter here

About Wire + Nail Gallery

Wire + Nail Gallery is located in heart of the San Francisco’s Mission District. The store-front art space was founded in February 2011 by Art Dealer, Tricia Rampe. Wire + Nail focuses on supporting emerging artists, web-based projects, and fostering Bay Area regionalism. Wire + Nail is available for art openings and single night events. Rental of the space is also available by request.

Gallery hours are based on appointments. To visit, please call (415) 645-3805 or e-mail tr@wireandnail.com and is located at 3150 18th Street (at Treat Avenue), Suite 104, San Francisco, CA 94110

Learn more about Wire + Nail Gallery here

I can’t help it. I adore Carissa Potter. As a matter of fact, I have nice things to say about her here. Hope you clicked on ‘here’ and read about her…this post will definitely be here when you get back. 🙂

Okay, now that you’ve read about her. I’ve got more wonderful news, she’s working with Luca Antonucci (another incredible artist) on a special book project “The Stars Are In The Sky & The Stars Are In Your Eyes” for a Root Division show titled, “Over My Dead Body“.

You will definitely want to see the show!

Anais Nin once said that the role of the writer is to not to say what we can but to say what we cannot. The sentiment certainly translates well into the visual arts. Often, dishonesty abounds in everyday pleasantries, which is why the artist strives to reveal the truths of human interaction. To detect the context and sub-context. The artist mines the crevices of everyday exchanges and finds the raw, unpolished, sometimes tarnished, kernels of mundane gesture and speech to create something undeniable about the human condition. The artist is often brave enough to produce work that shows what one may conceal and obscure. Meet Carissa Potter. Her utilization of simple materials to express complex emotions is a clever depiction of the intensity and gravity of love in an authentic way.

Potter’s drawings are created from various materials such as pen, ink, marker, and textiles. Using techniques such as printmaking and installation, Potter’s multi-faceted work takes on dimensions that fit the ideas she is trying to convey. At the SOMArts Cultural Center’s Spread group exhibition earlier this year, she included a print piece, “You Love Me”. The work consists of an accordion folded paper piece that declares the words, “You love me” followed by images of commonly liked things (i.e., ice cream, sweaters, Harrison Ford, and unicorns, to name a few). Potter’s use of everyday objects in her art creates a strong bond and connection with her viewer.

At first glance, Potter’s drawings and sketches seem simple and straightforward. There’s an accessibility and resonance to the work. Her fondness for turning the multitude of everyday actions and thoughts into fine art has a tremendous effect on what the viewer is willing to experience and how they will do that. People understand authenticity. Love, loss, frustration, anger, happiness, sadness, and elation are all emotions people can correlate to their own experiences. In Potter’s work, there is something for everyone regardless of whatever culture, sub-culture or ethnicity someone identifies with. There is something about the individual viewer in the work.

Although some of the works may produce feelings of uneasiness or conjure one’s insecurities and fears, they give the viewer permission to engage, feel, and re-act. For individuals that crave art that is witty and complex, yet simple and straightforward, Carissa Potter is the artist to view. With bits of humor nestled between the lines of images and text, one is welcome to simply enjoy the quips. The intention of the artist is also left to the viewer. Whether the art is a cathartic expression or musings on unanswered questions of lost love, the artist welcomes whatever perception and understanding you have of what you see. Another aspect of her work deconstructs the moments we may forbid ourselves to experience or reactions to situations that we may normally suppress. One may ask, seeing a chronicle of the artist’s depictions and understandings of love and loss, what makes this art and why pay attention? Without question, Potter braves the impervious layers of life, dusts off all the fossilized sentiments, desires, and angst and hits directly upon the nerves that force the observer to beautifully collide the past with the present and future.

Please click here to view Carissa Potter’s work.

Published to Asterisk SF Magazine.

Sharon Grace, Balls to the Wall, Single channel with sound, 2008

Spread is currently showing at the SOMArts Cultural Center. The posts to follow are first impressions and reflections about each pair of artists in the exhibition.

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An artist’s work is almost always derived from a mentor’s guidance or influence. An integral part of the professor’s role is to push the student to their limits; to test the student’s mental agility, intellectual stamina, and help nascent ideas bud into something greater than the student ever imagined. In the exhibition, Spread: California Conceptualism – Then & Now, the viewer sees five pairings – a vanguard artist and their student. Such an exhibition reminds the audience that each artist carries on the legacy of their teacher (even if their path is divergent).

While Sharon Grace’s single channel video of marbles bouncing off a hardwood floor while an individual in high heels walks ever so slowly across a wood floor; Carissa Potter’s work, I’m Attracted to You, is on the other side of the wall. Although both artists utilize different mediums, the commonality is their perspective on human interaction and behavior. Relationships between people and things is prevalent in their works. Even with Grace’s time based media, you interact with it the way you want, which is not too dissimilar to Potter’s work. There doesn’t seem to be an obligation to dig deep to find a particular meaning. You’re given a concept or idea of something (an experience) and you take it for what it is in a moment.

The key difference is the use of language as a device. Words are much more rampant in Potter’s work. Much of the complex ideas riddled within our minds are laid in a combination of text and images. Grace’s work, on the other hand, in particular, for the show, barely includes any text until you look at the deconstructed drawing of the box that holds a heap of marbles. In researching Grace’s work, language is verbally expressed versus written. Either way, the pairing, at first, may seem a bit enigmatic  but if you watch and read, keep in mind your behavior and responses to the works.

Carissa Potter, I