I will be participating on a panel discussion scheduled for  Tuesday, June 17th from 6:30-8:00 pm to discuss the work of Bay Area artist Evie Leder. Her current body (no pun intended, maybe) is currently on view at A Simple Collective (San Francisco, CA). Here’s an excerpt from the shows press release,

Evie Leder’s The Objects is a meditation on the male body consisting of approximately thirty videos, along with a series of detail photographs and video stills. Over a filming period of ten days, fourteen men—a diverse group of performers and artists in the San Francisco queer scene—visited the artist’s studio one by one. Creating an intimate space and relationship between artist and subject, Leder gave simple, but deliberate instruction: stand quietly, breathe, stretch, open and close eyes, turn…In Leder’s series, the men are objects, but specific, very human objects, with presence.

For more information, please visit the event link here

But I figured I would take a few minutes to chill from the craziness (i.e., orientation and some deadlines – yeah, someone needed something from me, like, yesterday). In any case, check out this project by artists Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese. Visit their Kickstarter page here to learn more about their upcoming works.

SOMArts Cultural Center Feature in Asterisk Magazine

Underneath a US interstate freeway in San Francisco’s South of Market District, on the border of Potrero Hill and Downtown San Francisco, one will not only find quite an industrious area, but a place tucked away from the busy street that encapsulates the vibrancy and pulse of the San Francisco culture and arts community. The SOMArts Cultural Center’s location is apropos considering its ambitious yet successful representation of an incredibly diverse community. The entrance is adorned by rock sculptures and benches reserved for cigarette breaks or art talk when the galleries are filled with people on opening night of any exhibition. With theatrical productions to large scale art installations, the center garners much of its attention through representations of the community, cultures, and sub-cultures that call the Bay Area-San Francisco home. Executive Director, Lex Leifeit, reflects on the balance the center must strike between showcasing traditional and cultural aspects of its diverse population with experimental and contemporary interpretations of the very traditions that create the community, The word traditional is tricky. Each culture has its own traditions. When people talk about traditional art in the art world, they’re often looking at it from a western perspective.

One of the most radical things SOMArts has done since it’s earliest beginnings that is more prevalent now in the field is to combine risk-taking contemporary art with specific cultural traditions. The beating heart of that approach within our organization is the annual Dia de los Muertos exhibition co-curated by Rene Yañez and Rio Yañez. ~ Lex Leifleit, SOMArts Cultural Center, Executive Director

As a community center, SOMArts provides below market value space for interested organizations looking to produce a show or install an exhibition. From visual artists to writers to educators, the center draws patrons and supporters from a multitude of disciplines through several annual events that include Feast of Words and 100 Performances for the Hole (originally conceived by Curator and Gallery Director Justin Hoover). The center also includes a lot of critical discussion through its Commons Curatorial Residency providing curators the opportunity to create an exhibition that encourages the community to engage and learn about art and artists’ practices that may not be readily accessible. Such a residency makes this discussion and dialogue available. Another aspect of the community engagement includes the SOMArts Interactive Video Channel, which fosters community engagement between SOMArts staff, artists, curators, and art lovers.

Originally posted to Asterisk 

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I asked a dear friend about her attention span. She was candid in sharing that if 200 characters don’t entice her, you’ve lost her. She is an intelligent woman and I completely trust her opinion. Now, that’s not a lot characters to lure someone in. Yet, it speaks to the culture we live in. Granted, this post (originally posted to zero1‘s blog) is pretty lengthy but the show resonated with me because words are important to me (duh!). Being a writer is difficult and challenging work. I constantly wonder who might care but as one of my great mentors shared with me…this is why you write…because you give someone something to care about. Okay, enough, enjoy the piece AND if you make it through the entire piece, I will send you something in the mail (promise). 😉

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Technology often conjures up images of mobile devices, machines, and programming. Yet, technology, according to Wikipedia, “…is the making, usage, and knowledge of tools, machines, techniques, crafts, systems, or methods of organization in order to solve a problem or perform a specific function”. With all the taxonomies and ever evolving nature of art, new technologies present themselves everyday. Yet, the barrage of images in the media are not the only thing that inundate us. Language is ubiquitous. What limitations do we experience when we’re forced to use only 140 characters? What does this impact the way we communicate? Or how do we make sense of the words that make it into our vernacular in such a fast paced environment? In Other Words, showing at the Intersection for the Arts, showcases the work of contemporary artists interpreting our collective relationship and understanding of language. Kevin Chen, Intersection for the Arts program director, gathered artists looking at the written word to extrapolate human behavior and creativity, re-configurations and semantics of language, the tactile nature of typography and script, and the physical placement of text.

Imagine the networks and visual spaces we visit. What would those lines, images, and words look like meshed together? Emanuela Harris-Sintamarian answers this question through her visual metaphors of social media. Her work forces the viewer to realize that it doesn’t really matter where you look because it is all within the same space. The habit-forming behavior of constantly checking our e-mail, looking for new tweets, and compulsively looking at peoples’ photo albums online is the basis for this work. She shows how we open ourselves up to a world hoping to find something new but it is all the same material. The same people in different places. Harris-Sintamarian’s work is a testament to how our minds might synthesize and re-appropriate the world.

Christine Wong Yap’s work looks at Optimism and Pessimism in human behavior. Inspired by the work of psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Yap’s drawings are interpretations of his notable sayings and statistical analyses. The replication of scientific text through drawing and handwriting solidifies good habits in the viewer as well. Yet they serve as meditations for the artist. Her well curated info-graphics and carefully written text are worth the attention. In this digital age, people will find Yap’s work refreshing because it serves to remind us of our capacity to create.

Katie Gilmartin Queer Words re-contextualizes the relationship between words and images. Although seemingly mundane and innocuous, words such as ‘bear’ may conjure a wild animal, yet take on a completely different meaning within the queer lexicon. The vernacular and pictures Gilmartin employs are humorous and overt. She plays into both our collective consciousness and gender constructs.

Speech and language take on a physical form in Alex Potts work while Cassie Thornton re-interprets the television as a form of purely textual communication. Past the main entrance, visitors see a spiral staircase with multiple white waxed cornucopias inviting the viewer to engage and experience space, form, and sound. Potts work with audio and feedback based on the participants’ engagement with the work is integral to comprehension of what language may sound like from one person to another. He creates the forms but relies on the active listener and participant to bring the piece to life. In Education Delivers People (2011), Cassie Thornton re-interprets Richard Serra and Carlota Fay Schoolman’s work, Television Delivers People (1973). Thornton’s piece seems to translate, to a certain degree, a similar message but tailored to a contemporary audience. Simultaneously, the work reflects history and how it relates to the current state of the economy. Through stand alone text, without all the images and superfluous media, the viewer becomes enlightened.

Textile work, “She wrote love letters in 1971”, by Julia Goodman, the viewer is left to imagine love letters. Goodman layered and folded memories together to create a simulacra of memories in a piece with very little text. The piece serves as a testament to how the imagination creates the stories, words, phrases, and tales perhaps much richer in the mind devoid of spell check. “Wear your biggest smile. (2012), by Annie Vought, is based on a collection of dreams culled from the Internet. She visualizes a particular order by precisely cutting away to reveal a translation of virtual to physical.

Lastly, physical engagement with text in space is seen in the work of Meryl Pataky. Your Company (2012) and Say It Out Loud (2012) made with steel, brass, and computer parts displays our digital waste and re-configures the refuse into physical three-dimensional language. The shapes and bends of the material simulate how we may perceive the world in which we work and find ourselves confined to. Pataky creates a bit of mysticism in his deconstruction. We see the words but don’t necessarily have to understand the etymology. We see them in space and that is all that matters. In contrast, Susan O’Malley sprinkles plaques throughout the venue coupled with larger sandwich boards adorning the center of the gallery space. O’Malley wants to lead the viewer to an experience of art through a playful hide and seek of text which serves as a metaphor to the hidden meanings of language we encounter on a daily basis. Overall, our relationship to language is multi-faceted and constantly evolving as seen in these works. Chen’s selection of artists not only illuminate the complexity of language but evoke our senses and reactions to them.

Originally posted to the zero1 blog

Four Poems of Love & a Sonnet of Despair by Carissa Potter

Hello friends and family!

If you find yourself roaming around San Francisco on Friday, February 10 not knowing what to do, please attend the opening for People I’ve Loved opening night at Wire + Nail Gallery in San Francisco’s Mission District. It will be a great show!! Please see the press release below for details!

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PRESS CONTACT:
Tricia Rampe, Curator
E-mail: tr@wireandnail.com
Telephone: (415) 645-3805
Web: http://wireandnail.com/

WIRE AND NAIL GALLERY PRESENTS, People I’ve Loved

Exhibition runs: Friday, February 10, 2012 – Friday, March 16, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, February 10, 2012 7PM -9PM
3150 18th Street (at Treat Avenue), Suite 104, San Francisco, CA 94110
Gallery hours: By Appointment Only

Wire + Nail Gallery is pleased to present People I’ve Loved, a collection of multimedia installations, drawings, and video installation by Carissa Potter. Please join us on Friday, February 10, 2012 from 7-9pm for the exhibition opening.

In a world filled with cynicism and despair, a lover of love in the arts is a rarity. Contemporary art often veers away from love as a subject matter. If love does find its way into an artwork, there’s a strong sense of irony or flippant use of the word and idea. Yet, with the perfect combination of authenticity and playfulness, Carissa Potter showcases the nature of amorous human interactions in such an undeniably beguiling way. Introducing new works in this exhibition, Potter addresses the physical, emotional, psychological, and intellectual aspects of love and desire.

Potter introduces new works looking at the physical and emotional facets of love. Marry Me on Market is performance based piece where the artist conducts impromptu commitment ceremonies on one of the most highly trafficked streets in San Francisco. The participation requires one to be fearless and unafraid. While art work, All You Left Me, a necklace made from a human kidney stone calls to mind the belief in fetishes and amulets. Even though the necklace is all that is left, it serves a purpose. A reminder, a souvenir of love and loss. It marks a forgotten or remembered time. You Tell Me What I Want to Hear, interprets the game of Telephone within the context of love and longing. This piece serves as a playful look into how the our mind may perceive one thing but unable to trust what we actually hear. Finally, 5 Poems of Love and A Sonnet of Despair, by Pablo Nuerda serves as a metaphor to the way in which love may be understood. The longing to translate something enigmatic and realizing, through the translation, familiarity resides. Potter’s translations mimic the way love is felt, instantaneously and without regard to any concept of what is right or wrong but what is felt.

About the Artist

Carissa Potter is a person who lives in San Francisco, California. Carissa currently is working on her first solo show at Wire and Nail Gallery, in the past she has shown at SomArts, E6 Gallery, Kitsch Gallery, and Root Division. She has been a featured artist in Asterisk Magazine, Conveyor Arts Magazine, HoneyDove, Mauve Gallery Journal, Site95, and FFFound. Carissa is a founding member of Colpa Press, a concept based print operation. For more information about Carissa, visit http://www.carissapotter.com or http://www.colpapress.com. Thank-you for reading and have a nice day.

Learn more about Carissa Potter here

About Wire + Nail Gallery

Wire + Nail Gallery is located in heart of the San Francisco’s Mission District. The store-front art space was founded in February 2011 by Art Dealer, Tricia Rampe. Wire + Nail focuses on supporting emerging artists, web-based projects, and fostering Bay Area regionalism. Wire + Nail is available for art openings and single night events. Rental of the space is also available by request.

Gallery hours are based on appointments. To visit, please call (415) 645-3805 or e-mail tr@wireandnail.com and is located at 3150 18th Street (at Treat Avenue), Suite 104, San Francisco, CA 94110

Learn more about Wire + Nail Gallery here